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A few nice insurance car company images I found:

Cost of War
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Image by elycefeliz
costofwar.com/

Recent wars, however, have not been provoked by economic factors for the most part. A study by Lewis F. Richardson suggests that the majority of the wars from 1850 to 1950 were related either to religious ideology or to national pride rather than to economic or security issues.
from Prisoners of Hate by Aaron T. Beck

www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/03/07/…

The Iraq adventure has seriously weakened the U.S. economy . . .

Senior Bush administration aides certainly pooh-poohed worrisome estimates in the run-up to the war. Former White House economic adviser Lawrence Lindsey reckoned that the conflict would cost 0 billion to 0 billion; Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld later called his estimate "baloney." Administration officials insisted that the costs would be more like billion to billion. In April 2003, Andrew S. Natsios, the thoughtful head of the U.S. Agency for International Development, said on "Nightline" that reconstructing Iraq would cost the American taxpayer just .7 billion. Ted Koppel, in disbelief, pressed Natsios on the question, but Natsios stuck to his guns. Others in the administration, such as Deputy Defense Secretary Paul D. Wolfowitz, hoped that U.S. partners would chip in, as they had in the 1991 Persian Gulf War, or that Iraq’s oil would pay for the damages.

The end result of all this wishful thinking? As we approach the fifth anniversary of the invasion, Iraq is not only the second longest war in U.S. history (after Vietnam), it is also the second most costly — surpassed only by World War II.

. . . The administration talks only about the upfront costs, which are mostly handled by emergency appropriations. (Iraq funding is apparently still an emergency five years after the war began.) These costs, by our calculations, are now running at billion a month — billion if you include Afghanistan. By the time you add in the costs hidden in the defense budget, the money we’ll have to spend to help future veterans, and money to refurbish a military whose equipment and materiel have been greatly depleted, the total tab to the federal government will almost surely exceed .5 trillion.

But the costs to our society and economy are far greater. When a young soldier is killed in Iraq or Afghanistan, his or her family will receive a U.S. government check for just 0,000 (combining life insurance with a "death gratuity") — far less than the typical amount paid by insurance companies for the death of a young person in a car accident. The stark "budgetary cost" of 0,000 is clearly only a fraction of the total cost society pays for the loss of life — and no one can ever really compensate the families. Moreover, disability pay seldom provides adequate compensation for wounded troops or their families. Indeed, in one out of five cases of seriously injured soldiers, someone in their family has to give up a job to take care of them.

President Bush tried to sell the American people on the idea that we could have a war with little or no economic sacrifice. Even after the United States went to war, Bush and Congress cut taxes, especially on the rich — even though the United States already had a massive deficit. So the war had to be funded by more borrowing. By the end of the Bush administration, the cost of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, plus the cumulative interest on the increased borrowing used to fund them, will have added about trillion to the national debt.

The long-term burden of paying for the conflicts will curtail the country’s ability to tackle other urgent problems, no matter who wins the presidency in November. Our vast and growing indebtedness inevitably makes it harder to afford new health-care plans, make large-scale repairs to crumbling roads and bridges, or build better-equipped schools. Already, the escalating cost of the wars has crowded out spending on virtually all other discretionary federal programs, including the National Institutes of Health, the Food and Drug Administration, the Environmental Protection Agency, and federal aid to states and cities, all of which have been scaled back significantly since the invasion of Iraq.

Think what a difference trillion could make for so many of the United States’ — or the world’s — problems. We could have had a Marshall Plan to help desperately poor countries, winning the hearts and maybe the minds of Muslim nations now gripped by anti-Americanism. In a world with millions of illiterate children, we could have achieved literacy for all — for less than the price of a month’s combat in Iraq. We worry about China’s growing influence in Africa, but the upfront cost of a month of fighting in Iraq would pay for more than doubling our annual current aid spending on Africa.

Closer to home, we could have funded countless schools to give children locked in the underclass a shot at decent lives. Or we could have tackled the massive problem of Social Security, which Bush began his second term hoping to address; for far, far less than the cost of the war, we could have ensured the solvency of Social Security for the next half a century or more.

Economists used to think that wars were good for the economy, a notion born out of memories of how the massive spending of World War II helped bring the United States and the world out of the Great Depression. But we now know far better ways to stimulate an economy — ways that quickly improve citizens’ well-being and lay the foundations for future growth. But money spent paying Nepalese workers in Iraq (or even Iraqi ones) doesn’t stimulate the U.S. economy the way that money spent at home would — and it certainly doesn’t provide the basis for long-term growth the way investments in research, education or infrastructure would.

edition.cnn.com/2005/WORLD/meast/01/30/iraq.audit/

Nearly billion of money spent on Iraqi reconstruction is unaccounted for because of inefficiencies and bad management, according to an inspector general’s report .

Image from page 643 of “Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine” (1912)
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Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: baltimoreohioemp03balt
Title: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Subjects: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Publisher: [Baltimore, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad]
Contributing Library: University of Maryland, College Park
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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Text Appearing Before Image:
ervice on his car fromWheeling to Martinsburg, and he did nothingspecial for me, either.Give him a good mark; he deserves it. Signed at Martinsburg, W. Va. Appreciation of Pullman Porter THE general agent of a Life Insurance Co.,whose headquarters are Martinsburg,W. Va., recently confirmed the opinionthat our Pullman superintendent in Balti-more has of one of his porters. He wroteour Baltimore Pullman people viz: October 6, 1915.Pullman Co., % Baltimore and Omo R. R., Baltimore, Md.Dear Sirs: Just a word in behalf of a good servant. I canthelp but feel that the Pullman Company should O, Lyric inexpressible as sweet, Love takes my voice away;I cannot tell thee when we meet,What most I long to say. But hadst thou hearing in thy heart, To know what beats in mine,Then shouldst thou walk, whereer thou art, In melodies divine. So warbling birds lift higher notes. Than to our ears belong;The music fills their throbbing throats, But silence steals the song. —Selected. THE DAYS OF REAL SPORT

Text Appearing After Image:
HOOKEY -Courtesy N._Y. Tribune The Annual Call for Harvest Hands By Dixon Van Valkenberg THE gay cat, even the old professionalhobo, gets irritable and restless when thegentle springtime rolls around. Fromeverywhere—east, west, north, south—these annual pilgrimagers start forth on thetrail of the elusive job. Some are looking forwork, most are not. The road has its attrac-tions, especially for the youth who likes excite-ment and adventure. His heart fairly cravesthe touch of the things he has heard about,, butnever seen. This is particularly true of theruralites. The railroads of this country are the dumpinggrounds for these will-o-the-wisps, especiallywhen the call for harvest hands is made known.In every district recruits await the annual lureof the golden fields. The lines that sufTermost from these annoying trespassers are prob-ably those in the southwest, in the great har-vesting belt of Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraskaand the Dakotas. The railroads and towiis inthese states are ob

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 957 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)
insurance car company
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Identifier: streetrailwayjo231904newy
Title: The Street railway journal
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors:
Subjects: Street-railroads Electric railroads Transportation
Publisher: New York : McGraw Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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Text Appearing Before Image:
rough tests by theInternational RailwayCompany, of Buffalo, N. Y.The result of these testswas so satisfactory as to warrant the consideration of this brake for general adoption onthe companys heaviest cars. The brake is adapted to any kind of car, from the singletruck to the heaviest and fastest suburban type. It is durablyconstructed, has few parts, and is easily operated and applied,because the drum works on roller bearings. The speed obtainedin taking up the slack chain and the great power gained whenapplying the brake are very valuable features. The spiral drum,with its eccentrically-geared cam construction, not only accom-plishes these objects but extends sufficiently to provide for thetaking up of any surplus chain caused by the car house menneglecting to keep the brakes properly adjusted. This lastfeature overcomes the only objection ever raised to the com-panys National brake, and its later type should, therefore,prove a very efficient hand brake for the most arduous ser-vice.

Text Appearing After Image:
IMPROVED HAND BRAKE ACCIDENT INSURANCE IN ST. LOUIS The employees of the St. Louis Transit Company will here-after be protected by accident insurance, the cost of whichwill be borne partly by the employees and partly by the com-pany. The plan of this fund became effective June 1 ; it wasproposed by the company and adopted by the Missouri StreetRailway Union, of which every motorman and conductor inthe employ of the company is a member. Payment of com-pulsory dues of 50 cents a month to the union have ceased. Intheir place the men are given the privilege of voluntarily con-tributing a similar amount to the accident fund, but only thosewho do make such contribution are entitled to the benefits of the fund. In order to further the movement the company hasagreed to contribute to the fund a sum equal to one-half of thatpaid in by the men. In addition to this the company will fur-nish free medical attendance in case of sickness or accident,and free legal advice should such be desired by a m

Note About Images
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